Interesting Sailing Phrases

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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Tue Apr 12, 2016 7:24 am

Chandlery: A maker and seller of candles was known as a chandler and the place where candles were made and sold was a chandlery. Boats at that time consumed large amounts of candles on a voyage. To replace those consumed, the captain would have to visit the local chandlery while in port. Chandlers would often stock other nautical goods, such as rope, leather and tar. Today the term refers to a boat supply store.

Ken B
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Wed Apr 13, 2016 6:11 am

Bell-Bottom Trousers: Originating aboard sailing vessels, the wide, flared, legs on bell-bottomed trousers are easy to roll up when working, cleaning or wading on a boat.

Ken B.
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Thu Apr 14, 2016 6:49 am

"I'd rather be in the boat with a drink on the rocks,
than in the drink with a boat on the rocks."

Ken B.
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Mon Apr 18, 2016 6:42 am

Aloof: A nautical order to keep the ship's head to the wind, thus to stay clear of a lee shore or some other quarter. The front part of the sail which meets the wind is called the luff. A sailing vessel that could point higher to windward and hold its speed better than another was said to stand apart or to sail a-luff that later became aloof. Today the word is used to describe a person who is distant or stands apart from the others.

Ken B
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Tsatzsue
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Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Tue Apr 19, 2016 9:29 am

"First, in any storm, the tactic of lying ahull is almost never productive. My experiences have convinced me that a boat is better off when it’s moving. It isn’t as prone to being knocked down or capsized, and the psychological benefit of forward progress and a proactive approach can’t be overstated. I had mentioned this to Carl many times. What to do in heavy weather was one of his favorite topics of conversation. Second, in a hurricane much stronger than the storms I’d experienced, survival would be unlikely and, in that absolute chaos, would be reduced to a question of luck or grace—not tactics. Third, when breaking seas surround a boat—seas as high as 50 feet or more, their tops plunging forward in tons of white, oxygenated foam approaching speeds of 40 knots—there is a game of Russian roulette afoot. Just one of those seas scoring a direct hit on a boat can stove its portlights or rip off the deck or the cabintop and will almost certainly roll it over. Then the end may be near. The story of Kampeska shows that even in a comparatively weak hurricane, the most seaworthy vessel is just one wave away from disaster. And finally, the only sure way to survive a hurricane at sea in a small boat is to avoid it. I hoped Carl was avoiding Lenny. Toward dawn, I finally fell asleep, gnawing that bone.

Kretschmer, John (2009-12-18). At the Mercy of the Sea: The True Story of Three Sailors in a Caribbean Hurricane (p. 134). McGraw-Hill Education. Kindle Edition.

Had to post this. Reading the story now. Hard to put down!!

Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Wed Apr 20, 2016 6:09 am

“Pipe down”
Parents have been screaming “pipe down” to their kids forever, but where does that actually come from? Apparently, Pipe Down was the last signal from the Bosun’s pipe each day, which meant lights-out, quiet down, time to go to bed

Ken B
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Thu Apr 21, 2016 6:29 am

Leeway -
The weather side of a ship is the side from which the wind is blowing. The Lee side is the side of the ship sheltered from the wind. A lee shore is a shore that is downwind of a ship. If a ship does not have enough leeway it is in danger of being driven onto the shore.

Ken B.
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Tsatzsue
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Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Wed Apr 27, 2016 1:32 pm

"If one does not know to which port one is sailing, no wind is favorable".

Lucius Annaeus Seneca

Ken B.
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Mon May 02, 2016 7:07 am

“Toe the line”
Perhaps you’ve been at work and your boss has scowled at you and said, “toe the line, or you’re gone”. If this has happened to you, we are sorry, that sounds like a horrible work environment. But, if you were wondering about the origins of his demand, it’s an old naval expression that refers to a ship’s crew who would be called to gather and form a line with their toes all touching a given seam (or line) of the deck planking.

Ken B.
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Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Wed May 04, 2016 6:37 am

By and Large”
Folks say this one all the time to refer to the big picture. “By and large, ASA is the most awesome organization in existence”… something like that. This term got started on a sailboat with the word “by” meaning into the wind and “large” meaning off the wind. So sailors would say: “By and large this ship handles quite nicely.”

Enough Rain!! I have boat work to do!!

Ken B.
Cmdre - NETS

The best thing one can do when it's raining is to let it rain. -- Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Tsatzsue
sailfish
Posts: 115
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2013 9:21 am
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Fri May 06, 2016 6:46 am

“Son of a gun”
It’s amazing that this phrase has lasted so long. Back in the day, as you might imagine, sailors were often less than virtuous and every once in a while a “lady friend” of a crewman might give birth to a child on the ship. A good spot for this sort of thing was between the guns on the gun deck. Now let’s say this little rascal isn’t claimed by any of the aforementioned sleazy sailors, this little grommet would sometimes be called a “son of a gun”.

Happy Sailing!!
Ken B.
Cmdre - NETS

Do not be angry with the rain; it simply does not know how to fall upwards. -- Vladimir Nabokov

Tsatzsue
sailfish
Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Tue May 10, 2016 9:15 am

Rummage Sale -
From the French arrimage meaning ship's cargo. Damaged cargo was sold off, eventually becoming called a rummage sale.

Ken B.
Cmdre - North East Trailer sailor Yacht Club

The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
- William Arthur Ward

Tsatzsue
sailfish
Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Thu May 12, 2016 6:26 am

listless

When a ship was listless, she was sitting still and upright in the water, with no wind to make her lean over (list) and drive ahead.

Ken B. Cmdre - NETS

Tsatzsue
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Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Wed May 18, 2016 11:17 am

“Loose cannon”
Everyone has known a few people who are loose cannons – unpredictable and dangerous on some level. Not surprisingly the term comes from when a ship’s cannon would come loose from it’s lashing. The big dangerous thing would be sliding all over the place making for some uncomfortable time on deck trying to get that bad boy back in its spot.

Ken B.
Cmdre NETS

Tsatzsue
sailfish
Posts: 115
Joined: Wed Apr 17, 2013 9:21 am
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Thu May 19, 2016 9:35 am

“I really don't know why it is that all of us are so committed to the sea, except I think it's because in addition to the fact that the sea changes, and the light changes, and ships change, it's because we all came from the sea. And it is an interesting biological fact that all of us have in our veins the exact same percentage of salt in our blood that exists in the ocean, and, therefore, we have salt in our blood, in our sweat, in our tears. We are tied to the ocean. And when we go back to the sea - whether it is to sail or to watch it - we are going back from whence we came.

[Remarks at the Dinner for the America's Cup Crews, September 14 1962]”
― John F. Kennedy

Happy Sailing!
Ken B.
Cmdre - NETS

Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Thu May 26, 2016 7:21 am

Cranky: From the Dutch krengd, a crank was an unstable sailing vessel. It has come to mean irritable.


Happy Sailing!

Ken B.
CMDRE - NETS

Tsatzsue
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Tue Jun 07, 2016 9:13 am

"The cure for all that ails a man is saltwater--in the form of sweat, tears or the sea"

Ken B
CMDRE - NETS

Tsatzsue
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Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Fri Jun 24, 2016 9:28 am

“There’s no thrill in easy sailing when the skies are clear and blue, there’s no joy in merely doing things which any one can do. But there is some satisfaction that is mighty sweet to take, when you reach a destination that you never thought you’d make.”
– Author Unknown

Happy Sailing!!
Ken B.
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OverEasy
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by OverEasy » Sun Jun 26, 2016 10:32 pm

"Any damn fool can navigate the world sober, it takes a really good sailor to do it drunk!"

~Sir Francis Chichester (while loading his boat with gin)

Tsatzsue
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Posts: 115
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Re: Interesting Sailing Phrases

Post by Tsatzsue » Mon Aug 08, 2016 6:39 am

“Slush fund” — money set aside by a business or other organization for corrupt activities or money set aside to use for fun or entertainment expenses

During the age of sail, salted meat was preserved throughout the duration of a voyage in barrels below decks. When a barrel of salted meat had been finished off, there was often a slushy, foul mix of fat and salt at the bottom of the barrel which the ship’s cook would save and resell once they arrived in port. This money would then regularly be used to purchase some form of luxury for the crew usually not afforded to them. The practice is recorded in an 1839 edition of Evils & Abuses in Naval & Merchant Service by William McNally:

Happy Sailing
Ken B.
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